1980 Study Found That Social Interactions Are A Major Cause Of Smiling And Cost Taxpayers $250,000

Must read

Morgan Stanley slashes its U.S. housing market outlook—where it sees the home price correction going in 2023

On a national basis, home prices fell 1.3% between June and August. That marked the first decline measured by the lagged Case-Shiller National Home...

When will Netflix shutter its DVD mail service? It’s a matter of when, not if.

Netflix’s trailblazing DVD-by-mail rental service has been relegated as a relic in the age of video streaming, but there is still a steady —...

Europeans furious about Joe Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act are threatening a trade spat: ‘Nobody wants to get into a tit-for-tat’

The European Union and the United States are treading precariously close to a major trans-Atlantic trade dispute at a time when the two Western giants...

New Jersey could kill up to 2.4 million trees in one of the state’s environmental treasures—but officials say they’re just scrawny shrubs

Up to 2.4 million trees would be cut down as part of a project to prevent major wildfires in a federally protected New Jersey...

By Adam Andrzejewski for RealClearPolicy

In 1980, the National Institute for Mental Health spent $75,000 on a study—about $250,000 in 2021 dollars—to look at why bowlers, hockey fans, and pedestrians smile.

They found “strong evidence that social involvement rather than emotional state was the major cause of smiling.”

For this study, Sen. William Proxmire, a Democrat from Wisconsin, gave the National Institute for Mental Health a Golden Fleece award for wasteful and nonsensical spending.

“In my opinion, the American taxpayers will say, with a puckish grin, that they are not bowled over by this pedestrian study,” Proxmire said then.

The researchers watched members of those three groups, both with the groups knowing and without their knowledge, to determine whether smiling evolved as an expression of happiness, friendliness, or both.

RELATED: South Florida Man Buys Lamborghini, Rolex, And More With Fraudulent $2.1 Million PPP Loan

They noted that bowlers often smile when socially engaged, including looking at and talking to others, but not necessarily after scoring a spare or a strike.

Support Conservative Voices!

Sign up to receive the latest political news, insight, and commentary delivered directly to your inbox.

By subscribing, you agree to receive emails from ThePoliticalInsider.com and that you’ve read and agree to our privacy policy and to our terms and conditions. You further agree that the use of reCAPTCHA is subject to the Google Privacy and Terms of Use.

“At a hockey game, fans smiled both when they were socially involved and after events favorable to their team,” the study found. “Pedestrians were much more likely to smile when talking but only slightly more likely to smile in response to nice weather than to unpleasant weather.”

The studies suggest an association of smiling with a social motivation, researchers found.

“While I have no objections to a study of smiling as such, involved here is a question of priorities,” Proxmire said. “In this period of double-digit, galloping inflation, should the hard-pressed taxpayer be asked to pay for an academic version of bowling for dollars?”

Syndicated with permission from Real Clear Wire.

The #WasteOfTheDay is presented by the forensic auditors at OpenTheBooks.com.

The opinions expressed by contributors and/or content partners are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Political Insider.

More articles

Latest article

Morgan Stanley slashes its U.S. housing market outlook—where it sees the home price correction going in 2023

On a national basis, home prices fell 1.3% between June and August. That marked the first decline measured by the lagged Case-Shiller National Home...

When will Netflix shutter its DVD mail service? It’s a matter of when, not if.

Netflix’s trailblazing DVD-by-mail rental service has been relegated as a relic in the age of video streaming, but there is still a steady —...

Europeans furious about Joe Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act are threatening a trade spat: ‘Nobody wants to get into a tit-for-tat’

The European Union and the United States are treading precariously close to a major trans-Atlantic trade dispute at a time when the two Western giants...

New Jersey could kill up to 2.4 million trees in one of the state’s environmental treasures—but officials say they’re just scrawny shrubs

Up to 2.4 million trees would be cut down as part of a project to prevent major wildfires in a federally protected New Jersey...

Finland to return sanctioned Russian property

Several hundred Russian...