More Book Recommendations

Must read

U.S. soccer removes Islamic Republic logo from Iran flag to show ‘support for the women in Iran’

The U.S. Soccer Federation briefly displayed Iran’s national flag on social media without the emblem of the Islamic Republic, saying the move supported protesters...

China’s rare public rebellion against zero-COVID lockdowns sends markets tumbling

U.S. futures were lower after a mixed, shortened session Friday on Wall Street. Oil prices fell more than $2 a...

Amid protests over lockdowns, Goldman Sachs warns that China’s COVID-zero exit may be ‘forced and disorderly’

China’s climbing COVID caseload and expanding lockdown measures, which prompted rare public protests over the weekend, highlight the risk of an unplanned and chaotic...

The mining industry can’t ignore a startup’s solution to a decades-old copper problem: ‘The potential is enormous’

The warnings keep getting louder: the world is hurtling toward a desperate shortage of copper. Humans are more dependent than ever on a metal...

Will’s post prompted me to follow his lead (since all the cool kids are doing it):

[1.] I echo Will’s recommendation of The Scout Mindset, by Julia Galef:

A book about how and why to be rational—that is, to try to see the world as it is even if it isn’t what we wish. (A “soldier mindset” is committed to fighting back against beliefs we don’t currently hold; a “scout mindset” is committed to learning the truth about what’s out there, even if it’s bad news.) The book also demonstrates great sympathy for the emotional urges that make it hard for us to think clearly, using stories and examples ranging from the Dreyfuss Affair to the author’s own love life. Important and maybe life-changing.

[2.] I also quite liked Neal Stephenson’s new novel, Termination Shock, which is a technothriller more than science fiction (though it can technically be described as very near-future SF). And I further echo Will’s recommendations of Andy Weir’s Project Hail Mary and Martha Wells’ Murderbot series, of which the latest book (Fugitive Telemetry) came out this year.

[3.] Moving from SF/SFish to fantasy (I suppose what would be called “urban fantasy,” with police procedural thrown in), I continue to much enjoy Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London series, of which the latest (What Abigail Did That Summer) came out this year as well. And, though I haven’t been able to get in to Ann Leckie’s more famous books (such as Ancillary Justice), I much enjoyed her weird, wonderful fantasy The Raven Tower (2019, I know, but I just read it this year, so I thought I’d throw it in).

More articles

Latest article

U.S. soccer removes Islamic Republic logo from Iran flag to show ‘support for the women in Iran’

The U.S. Soccer Federation briefly displayed Iran’s national flag on social media without the emblem of the Islamic Republic, saying the move supported protesters...

China’s rare public rebellion against zero-COVID lockdowns sends markets tumbling

U.S. futures were lower after a mixed, shortened session Friday on Wall Street. Oil prices fell more than $2 a...

Amid protests over lockdowns, Goldman Sachs warns that China’s COVID-zero exit may be ‘forced and disorderly’

China’s climbing COVID caseload and expanding lockdown measures, which prompted rare public protests over the weekend, highlight the risk of an unplanned and chaotic...

The mining industry can’t ignore a startup’s solution to a decades-old copper problem: ‘The potential is enormous’

The warnings keep getting louder: the world is hurtling toward a desperate shortage of copper. Humans are more dependent than ever on a metal...