Teleworking Democrat Members of Congress Cost Taxpayers $70 Million Since Start of Pandemic

Must read

Most gig workers in Seattle are now entitled to paid sick leave

Most gig workers in Seattle will be permanently entitled to paid sick leave and safe time under a first-in-the-nation law signed by Seattle Mayor...

Adidas ends its war with Black Lives Matter over a ‘confusingly similar’ triple-stripe mark used on its merchandise for decades

Adidas is withdrawing its challenge to a Black Lives Matter trademark application featuring three parallel stripes, two days after it contested the image with...

Twitter removes posts promoting a transgender rights rally because its name ‘does not imply peaceful protest

Twitter says it has removed thousands of tweets showing a poster promoting a “trans day of vengeance” protest in support of transgender rights in...

How a major chemical company is moving into the future while reckoning with a dangerous legacy

On this week’s episode of Fortune‘s Leadership Next podcast, co-host Alan Murray speaks with Mark Newman, the CEO and president of Chemours (No. 502 on the 2022...

By Adam Andrzejewski for RealClearPolicy

While President Joe Biden urged “Americans to get back to work” and said “people working from home can feel safe to begin to return to the office” Democratic members of Congress think that doesn’t apply to them, according to the Washington Free Beacon.

The news outlet reveals how a large number of Congressional offices continue to sit empty in Washington D.C., ostensibly because of Covid-19. We estimate that these closed offices cost American taxpayers $139,548 each day.

The Free Beacon reports that “dozens” of House offices sat vacant on the day of their visit in March, with signs informing visitors that staff was teleworking. They also reported 12 vacant Senate offices.

Each House office is given about $944,671 per year to cover administrative expenses and pay its’ staff’s salaries. The Senate’s allocation is based on the size of the Senator’s state, but the average allocation is roughly $3.3 million.

RELATED: Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Wasted $17M On Empty Hotel Rooms

That comes out to $2,588 per day per House office, and $9,041 per day per Senate office. That totals $31,056 per day, with a very conservative estimate of 12 House offices working from home, and $108,492 for the 12 Senate offices working virtually.

That means American taxpayers are footing a bill of at least $139,548 per day for teleworking Congressional staff members. For the last two years of teleworking, with about 500 workdays costing a total of $69.7 million.

Support Conservative Voices!

Sign up to receive the latest political news, insight, and commentary delivered directly to your inbox.

By subscribing, you agree to receive emails from ThePoliticalInsider.com and that you’ve read and agree to our privacy policy and to our terms and conditions. You further agree that the use of reCAPTCHA is subject to the Google Privacy and Terms of Use.

Of course, teleworking doesn’t mean that staff are not working. However, with Congress meeting in person, work would surely be more efficient with everyone meeting in the same place.

Constituents that visit their members of Congress in D.C. can’t visit these offices. Having access to your elected officials is an important part of any democracy.

Notable office closures include Senate Majority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer and Sen. Patty Murray, the chair of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. 

Syndicated with permission from Real Clear Wire.

The #WasteOfTheDay is brought to you by the forensic auditors at OpenTheBooks.com

The opinions expressed by contributors and/or content partners are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Political Insider.

More articles

Latest article

Most gig workers in Seattle are now entitled to paid sick leave

Most gig workers in Seattle will be permanently entitled to paid sick leave and safe time under a first-in-the-nation law signed by Seattle Mayor...

Adidas ends its war with Black Lives Matter over a ‘confusingly similar’ triple-stripe mark used on its merchandise for decades

Adidas is withdrawing its challenge to a Black Lives Matter trademark application featuring three parallel stripes, two days after it contested the image with...

Twitter removes posts promoting a transgender rights rally because its name ‘does not imply peaceful protest

Twitter says it has removed thousands of tweets showing a poster promoting a “trans day of vengeance” protest in support of transgender rights in...

How a major chemical company is moving into the future while reckoning with a dangerous legacy

On this week’s episode of Fortune‘s Leadership Next podcast, co-host Alan Murray speaks with Mark Newman, the CEO and president of Chemours (No. 502 on the 2022...

The ‘American Century’ is Over. Our Politicians Killed It.

For a little over a hundred years, the United States and its dearest friends across the pond have...